Łagów is a town situated on the River Łągowica, on the route from Kielce to Opatów. In the 11th century there was a royal settlement with a castellany and a castle there. In 1085 it became the property of Wrocław bishopric. The village lied on the border between fertile Opat loess land and forests of Łysa Góra[1.1]. It was granted municipal rights in 1375 by Elisabeth of Poland on the request of Bishop Zbytul[1.2]. The town had a characteristic layout with a trapeze-shaped market square and a building of “kramnica” [a building with stalls] where merchants displayed their goods. The town was flourishing in the 15th and 16th centuries. Łagów was famous for pottery, iron, lead smelting and the production of glass[1.3]. In 1534 the town numbered 600 people, while in 1631 it had 1150 inhabitants. Łagów enjoyed a privilege of 10 fairs. A decrease in the town’s significance was connected with the collapse in metal mining.

The Great Sejm nationalized Łagów. In 1827 the town had 269 houses and 1200 inhabitants. The economic attempts undertaken by Stanisław Staszic to save the town were interrupted by the January Uprising. In 1869 Łagów lost its municipal rights.

Print
Footnotes
  • [1.1] J. Fijałkowski, Opowieści z Gór Świętokrzyskich, Zagnańsk – Kielce 2004, p. 79.
  • [1.2] Cz. Hadamik, D. Kalina, E. Traczyński, Gmina Łagów, Kielce 2004, p. 142.
  • [1.3] J. Fijałkowski, Opowieści z Gór Świętokrzyskich, Zagnańsk – Kielce 2004, p. 80.