The first Jews settled in Świerże in 1537 - 1550. In 1565, the town population was 210, inSwierze, [w:] The Encyclopedia of Jewish Life Before and During the Holocaust, red. S. Spector, G. Wigoder, t. 3, New York 2001, s. 1271.]].
cluding 14 Jewish families. Majority of shops and inns in Świerże were owned by the Jews.

In 1900, the town numbered 480 people, including 315 Jews (65%). In the period preceding World War II, Świerże was the second richest municipality in Chełm county, following Wojsławice. The Jews completely dominated the local trade. In 1910 - 1918, Arbuz Josif Mordko was a rabbi[1.1].

In 1918, Świerże was inhabited by 2,180 people, including 294 Jews[1.2]. The Jews had a steam bath near the slaughter house.

When World War II broke out, in Spring 1940, the Germans established a Jewish ghetto in Świerże. In December 1940, about 80 Jews from Krakow were brought there. The total number of people in the ghetto was 450-800[1.3]

In 1943, the Jews from Świerże were sent to the german nazi extermination camp in Sobibór. They covered the distance of 40 km to Sobibór on foot. The Jewish community in Świerże ceased to exist.

Bibliography

  • Swierze, [w:] The Encyclopedia of Jewish Life Before and During the Holocaust, ed. S. Spector, G. Wigoder, v. 3, New York 2001, p. 1271.
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Footnotes
  • [1.1] K. Zieliński, Żydzi Lubelszczyzny 1914 - 1918, Lublin 1999, p. 379.
  • [1.2] Swierze, [in:] The Encyclopedia of Jewish Life Before and During the Holocaust, ed. S. Spector, G. Wigoder, t. 3, New York 2001, p. 1271
  • [1.3] Swierze, [w:] The Encyclopedia of Jewish Life Before and During the Holocaust, red. S. Spector, G. Wigoder, v. 3, New York 2001, p. 1271