The Treaty of Westphalia of 24 October 1648, ending the Thirty Years' War, made the granting of permission for Jews to settle subject to the decision of the landowners. The provisions of the treaty also applied to Upper Silesia. Thanks to this change, the first Jews settled in Miejsce around 1657.

In 1737, 6 Jewish families lived in Miejsce. Their names are known and are as follows: Arie, Beniamin Cassriel, Loebel Eibenitz, Jakob Deutsch Eibenitz, Lazarus Alexander and Salomon Pinkus.

During the First Silesian War in 1742, most of Silesia came under the rule of the Kingdom of Prussia (with the exception of Cieszyn Silesia and the Duchy of Troppau). In 1757, 26 Jews lived in Miejsce (13% of the total population). At that time, the Jewish community employed a person, described in sources as Schulbedienter, responsible for the religious education of children. In 1771 or 1772, a Jewish cemetery was founded.

On August 8, 1781, King Frederick II of Prussia issued an edict ordering the Jews to leave the Upper Silesian villages, go to the cities and take up trade. He made exceptions only for four villages: Langendorf (Wielowieś), Czieschowa (Cieszowa), Kraskau (Kraskowa) and Städtel, erroneously regarded as Sośnicowice - in fact, the thing was about Miejsce.

Around 1780, with the permission of the Kotulinski family, a wooden synagogue was built in Miejsce. In 1782, 33 Jewish families (145 people) lived in the village, a year later - 155 Jews, and in 1785 - there were 25 Jewish families.

In 1845, the Jewish community in Miejsce ran its own school, which employed a teacher. At that time, 241 Jews lived there (30% of the total population). In the first half of the 19th century, the community had its only rabbi named David Laqueur. Also teachers: Lazarus Samuel Goldstein, Joseph Rund, Feibisch Bendan and Joachim Cohn, as well as ritual slaughterers: David Nachschoen and David Spiegel, were employed.

A change in Prussian legislation allowed Jews to leave Miejsce freely and move to better developed cities in Germany. In 1860, the local community became a branch of the Jewish community in Namysłów. As a result of the progressive migration, in 1862 only 27 Jews remained in Miejsce.

At the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries, most of the local Jews emigrated to the West. In 1904, only 10 Jews lived in the village. At the beginning of the 20th century, the local Jewish community was formally dissolved.

After the rebirth of the Polish state in 1918, the village became part of Germany. In 1925, 10 Jews still lived here.

Bibliography

  • Borkowski M., Kirmiel A., Włodarczyk T, Śladami Żydów: Dolny Śląsk, Opolszczyzna, Ziemia Lubuska, Warszawa 2008.
  • Gwóźdź K., Żydzi w okresie Habsburgów, [in:] Historia Tarnowskich Gór, ed. J. Drabina, Tarnowskie Góry 2000.
  • Knie J.G., Alphabetisch statistisch, topographische Uebersicht der Dorfer, Flecken, Stadte und anderes Orte der Konigl. Preuss. Provinz Schlesien, Breslau 1845.
  • Jaworski W., Żydzi w województwie śląskim w okresie międzywojennym, Katowice 1991.
  • Ziviera E., Rozwój osadnictwa żydowskiego na Górnym Śląsku, „Zeszyty Gliwickie” 2002vol. 30.
  • Knie J.G., Alphabetisch statistisch, topographische Uebersicht der Dorfer, Flecken, Stadte und anderes Orte der Konigl. Preuss. Provinz Schlesien, Breslau 1845.

 

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