According to the records contained in “Księga Pamięci Brzozowa” (“Memorial Book of Brzozów”), throughout the centuries, the Jews of Brzozów buried their dead on two cemeteries. In the text entitled “Z lat dzieciństwa. Spacer po miasteczku” („From childhood years. A walk in the town”), Avraham Levite wrote: „The cemetery or „bejs olam” was also called „hajlike ort”, a new “sacred place”- as compared to the “old” cemetery situated at the forest frontier, a few kilometers away from the town. The old cemetery had not been used since decades and only few people came here in search of graves”. The location of the necropolis is unknown – it cannot be ruled out that the local Jews had buried the dead in a cemetery situated in some other town until the time when the first religious community in Brzozów was established. It was a common phenomenon until the early 19th century – for example, due to the lack of their own cemetery, the Jews from the Warsaw region buried the dead in localities that were even several dozen kilometers away from where they lived.
 

The Jewish cemetery in Brzozów that exists until this day was probablybestablished in the first half of the 19th century, at today’s ul. Cegłowska (Cegłowska Street). Avraham Levite, the author mentioned above, claims that “the used cemetery was situated closer to the town and could be reached by the path behind the park near the brickyard”. During World War II, the Nazis carried out executions of the inhabitants of Brzozów who were of Jewish origin. It was probably then that the Germans removed some of the tombstones. The devastation also continued after the liberation – matzevot disappeared and trash gradually began to clutter the area of the necropolis. The situation didn't change until the 1990s when, , the cemetery was cleaned and surrounded by a fence at the initiative of Drejza and Natan Weiss and with the financial support of Zygfryd Kellerman, Roman Laufer and Leon Reich.
Over a dozen fragments of the tombstones that were found were placed in the area as well. The only matzeva that was preserved in whole is ornamented with a five-branched candelabrum and comes from the grave of Rachel Trachman, wife of the owner of the local brickyard.

The cemetery gate is closed. Ask dwellers of nearby estates where the key is kept.

The point on mapa.szukacz.pl

The point on mapy.google.pl
 

 

 

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