The first Jewish settlers arrived in Michów probably in the second half of the 17th century[[refr: | Michow [entry] in: The Encyclopedia of Jewish Life Before and During the Holocaust, eds. S. Spector, G. Wigoder, vol. 2, New York 2001, p. 818.]] Over the course of the 19thcentury, the local Jewish community was on demographic rise – while in the 1820s Jews made only 17 percent of the entire population, the number rose to 60 percent at the end of the century[1.1]. In 1889, after Michów lost its city rights, the then landowner Jan Korwin-Piotrowski sold the town hall to Srul Biderman to arrange a tavern there[1.2]. Towards the end of the century, the municipality of Michów administered the synagogue situated on the present Podwalna Street and, most probably, a mikveh[1.3].

Interwar period

In interwar years, Michów Jews faced difficult conditions, due to the tough economic situation and increasing tax burden and growing anti-Semitic tendencies. The community board supervised the synagogue, a mikveh and a ritual slaughterhouse as well as the Jewish cemetery[1.4]. The Orthodox formed a majority in local society but the ideology Zionism was growing more and more influential for the younger generation[1.5].

Occupation

Some historical studied show that shortly after the Nazis seized the town, Michów Jews and another seven hundred dwellers of Łysoboki were taken to the ghetto in Łuków nearby. Many of them died of starvation and typhus epidemics[[refr: | Michow [entry] in: The Encyclopedia of Jewish Life Before and During the Holocaust, eds. S. Spector, G. Wigoder, vol. 2, New York 2001, p. 818.]]. On June 6th, 1942, all of them were moved to the ghetto in Opole, from where groups of men were transported to unidentified places while the rest were most probably deported to the death camp in Sobibór[[refr: | Michow [entry] in: The Encyclopedia of Jewish Life Before and During the Holocaust, eds. S. Spector, G. Wigoder, vol. 2, New York 2001, p. 818, J. Teodorowicz-Czerepińska (comp.), Studium historyczno-urbanistyczne Michowa, Lublin n.d. (monthly).]]. Other sources contain information proving that in May 1942, Michów Jews were loaded on wagons and taken to the railway station in Klementowice, from where most of the were deported to the death camp in Sobibór, while others were taken to the camp in Majdanek[1.6].

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Footnotes

  • [1.1] J. Teodorowicz-Czerepińska (comp.), Studium historyczno-urbanistyczne Michowa, Lublin n.d. (monthlyl).
  • [1.2] J. Teodorowicz-Czerepińska (comp.), Studium historyczno-urbanistyczne Michowa, Lublin n.d. (monthly).
  • [1.3] J. Teodorowicz-Czerepińska (edit.), Studium historyczno-urbanistyczne Michowa, Lublin n.d. (monthly).
  • [1.4] Archiwum Państwowe w Lublinie, Urząd Wojewódzki Lubelski, Wydział Społeczno-Polityczny, sygn. 799, s. 5; 718, s. 10(National Archives in Lublin, Office of Lubelskie Province, Social-Political Division, Call No. 799, p. 5; 718, p.10)
  • [1.5] Michow [entry] in: The Encyclopedia of Jewish Life Before and During the Holocaust, eds. S. Spector, G. Wigoder, vol. 2, New York 2001, p. 818.
  • [1.6] source: http://trobal.pulawy.pl/node/266 [accessed on April 4th, 2011].