A masonry synagogue was built in the first half of the 17th century. According to a story, the building was bought as a closed down Calvinist church; however, this story has no historical validation. The synagogue underwent numerous reconstructions and conversions. In the 18th century, wooden halls for women were separated, which were rebuilt as masonry structures in the 19th century. It has a square ground plan. At the frontal, there is a Hebrew inscription: “Oh, what fear this places instills! It can be nothing else but a House of God”. Two street lamps stood in front of the entrance. The synagogue has both classicist and baroque elements; it is a compact structure with the monumental interior of the hall-central type.
In the centre, there is a large hall of 9 sections with the ceiling supported by four pillars. The interior boasted beautiful polychromes (mainly presenting animal and floral themes). Only small fragments of it survived until today. There are no remains of the Torah ark or bimah. There are three entrances to the building – two separate ones leading to women’s galleries and the main entrance. Behind the main entrance there is a vestibule with stairs to the upper floor. Currently, the entrance is protected by wooden doors. In 1986 - 1988, a new roof was built and the wooden windows were replaced. In 1939, the building suffered significant damage due the fire that ravaged the whole town. The synagogue was built below the street level. This was inspired by the words of psalms: “From the depths, I call to you, Lord!” During the Sabbath, the houses and area around the synagogue were fenced off due to religious laws.

During the war, the synagogue was used as hospital and warehouse – among others, for storing corn. After the war, it was still used as an auxiliary building – among others, sheep were kept in it, and other goods were stored. Currently, the building is locked and the area is fenced off and secured. Occasionally, exhibitions are organized inside.

By the exit road from Orla to Szczyt, the second Jewish cemetery in the town was located. It was established as the old one, located by the synagogue, had no more space. A dozen or so of tombstones survived until today; an uncertain number of them may remain shallow under the ground surface. The cemetery takes up 1.5 ha; it has no fence and is overgrown with grass. There are traces of digging in a few spots.

A masonry synagogue was built in the first half of the 17th century. According to a story, the building was bought as a closed down Calvinist church; however, this story has no historical validation. The synagogue underwent numerous reconstructions and conversions. In the 18th century, wooden halls for women were separated, which were rebuilt as masonry structures in the 19th century. It has a square ground plan. At the frontal, there is a Hebrew inscription: “Oh, what fear this places instills! It can be nothing else but a House of God”. Two street lamps stood in front of the entrance. The synagogue has both classicist and baroque elements; it is a compact structure with the monumental interior of the hall-central type.

In the centre, there is a large hall of 9 sections with the ceiling supported by four pillars. The interior boasted beautiful polychromes (mainly presenting animal and floral themes). Only small fragments of it survived until today. There are no remains of the Torah ark or bimah. There are three entrances to the building – two separate ones leading to women’s galleries and the main entrance. Behind the main entrance there is a vestibule with stairs to the upper floor. Currently, the entrance is protected by wooden doors. In 1986 - 1988, a new roof was built and the wooden windows were replaced. In 1939, the building suffered significant damage due the fire that ravaged the whole town. The synagogue was built below the street level. This was inspired by the words of psalms: “From the depths, I call to you, Lord!” During the Sabbath, the houses and area around the synagogue were fenced off due to religious laws.

During the war, the synagogue was used as hospital and warehouse – among others, for storing corn. After the war, it was still used as an auxiliary building – among others, sheep were kept in it, and other goods were stored. Currently, the building is locked and the area is fenced off and secured. Occasionally, exhibitions are organized inside. 

Virtual tour of the synagogue in Orla developed by Foundation for the Preservation of Jewish Heritage in Poland

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