First remarks concerning the colony of Piscowicze come from 1256[1.1]. In 1260 Pyskowice was granted municipal rights. In 1327 Duke Władysław Bytomski (1277-1352) pledged his faithfulness to the King of the Czech state, and since that moment Pyskowice remained under Czech domination and took part in the political history of Silesia. In 1338 the town was afflicted by an epidemic. In 1430 and 1433 the Hussite army robbed and devastated the towne[1.2]. In 1526, King Louis II Jagiellonian died childless, and the throne of the Czech state was taken by Ferdinand Habsburg, the Austrian archduke. By such a maneuver Pyskowice became part of Habsburg empire. In 1532 the town had a moat built around it, together with a wall with two gates. During the Thirty Years’ War (1618-1648) the town was conquered several times and devastated by various armies. In 1680, a great fire destroyed Pyskowice[1.3]. Since 1742, the town belonged to a Prussian state. In 1787, the town population amounted to 1,862 people[1.4]. At the turn of 18th and 19th centuries, a metallurgical industry began to develop, with two smelters built. In 1822, a wave of eleven fires ruined the town again. The launch of a railway connection between Opole and Gliwice, through Pyskowice station, stimulated local economic growth. In 1895 there were 4,194 Pyskowice citizens, and in 1905 this number grew up to 4,685[1.5].

During the interwar period, citizens of Pyskowice took active part in the Silesian Uprisings from 1919-1921. As a result of a referendum of 1921, the town remained part of Germany, under the name Peiskretscham.

During World War II, in January 1945, the Soviet army occupied the town, burning down a number of town buildings.

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Footnotes
  • [1.1] Johannes Chrząszcz „Historia miast Pyskowice i Toszek” Urząd Miasta Pyskowice 1994. p. 42
  • [1.2] Johannes Chrząszcz „Historia miast Pyskowice i Toszek” Urząd Miasta Pyskowice 1994. p. 50
  • [1.3] Johannes Chrząszcz „Historia miast Pyskowice i Toszek” Urząd Miasta Pyskowice 1994. p. 89
  • [1.4] Johannes Chrząszcz „Historia miast Pyskowice i Toszek” Urząd Miasta Pyskowice 1994. p. 112
  • [1.5] Johannes Chrząszcz „Historia miast Pyskowice i Toszek” Urząd Miasta Pyskowice 1994. p. 159